Pinched Nerve

by Dr. David Kramer

Given the wide range of possible etiologies for nerve compression or pinching of the nerve, it is important to consider obtaining a second opinion to ensure a clear understanding of the origin of your pain.

 

The experience of radiating arm or leg pain, numbness, tingling, and/or weakness in a very specific pattern within the extremity is often considered to be related to a pinched nerve. In general, the term “pinched nerve” refers to any compression of a nerve root that is exiting the spinal canal which subsequently travels bone spurstoward very discrete regions of the upper or lower extremities. Typically, a pinched nerve occurs as a result of pressure on an exiting nerve created by a bone spur or by a disc herniation. Alternatively, common degenerative changes in the soft and flexible cartilaginous discs results in narrowing of the bony holes, or foramen, through which the nerves exit the spine. This foraminal stenosis can also contribute to development of a pinched nerve. Spine trauma and pathologic conditions including tumors of the spine can also contribute to development of a pinched nerve. Given the wide range of possible etiologies for nerve compression or pinching of the nerve, it is important to consider obtaining a second opinion to ensure a clear understanding of the origin of your pain.

 

Dr. David Kramer

About Dr. David Kramer

Director of the Western Connecticut Health Network Spine Center since 2005, and with over 16 years in practice as a specialist in complex spinal surgery, Dr. Kramer conducts his spine practice at Connecticut Neck and Back Specialists in Danbury, Connecticut. He has been certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgeons since 1998. After earning his bachelors... Read More »